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Monday, September 7, 2015

Vox Suggests Republicans Who Support Ben Carson Are Racist (Really)

Those liberals can use the most outrageous things to attack Republicans but this needs to win some sort of Guinness world record. According to liberal website Vox the reason Dr. Ben Carson is rising in the polls is that Republicans are racists.  I know what you are thinking, "But Dr. Carson is African-American." Exactly-- that's why it deserves a record.

The article is called Ben Carson has surged into 2nd place behind Trump. Here’s why. A normal person would say his showing in the debate, or his campaigning, or possible the movement of all voters to support non-politicians like Bernie Sanders, Carly Fiorina, Donald Trump, as well as Ben Carson, but Vox isn't normal:
Sometimes, however, these citations of Carson's biography can have an implicit — or not so implicit — racial undertone. "He would be a wonderful role model for everyone, especially for the black people," 72-year-old Peggy Kemmerly of Elongee said. "You know, to get them off entitlements. He could open doors. Well, doors have been opened for them, but unfortunately they haven't accessed them." And Kolar said that he hoped Carson "removes the hyphen" in African-American to identify as "just American, to heal the racial divide we've been forced into."
Actually the first one to campaign on getting rid of the hyphens was Bobby Jindal I guess his supporters are racist also. And anyone who believes the racial divide hasn't increased under Barack Obama hasn't read a newspaper in eight years.
Despite what seemed to have been an unmemorable debate performance, there was one exchange where Carson clearly struck a chord with the audience. It was his response to a question from Megyn Kelly about race relations, which was interrupted by loud and sustained applause:
You know, we have the purveyors of hatred who take every single incident between people of two races and try to make a race war out of it, and drive wedges into people. And this does not need to be done...

I was asked by an NPR reporter once, why don’t I talk about race that often. I said it’s because I’m a neurosurgeon. And she thought that was a strange response. I said, you see, when I take someone to the operating room, I’m actually operating on the thing that makes them who they are. The skin doesn’t make them who they are. The hair doesn’t make them who they are.

And it’s time for us to move beyond that [loud, heavy applause]. Because our strength as a nation comes in our unity. We are the United States of America, not the divided states. And those who want to divide us are trying to divide us, and we shouldn’t let them do it.
Though Carson was vague about just who those "purveyors of hatred" trying "to make a race war" might be, the implication was clear — they're liberals. Carson is saying that although he's black, he's enlightened enough not to focus on unimportant matters of race that "divide us," and will instead take a race-blind approach to unite Americans.

That's just what conservatives want to hear. As racial issues have gained salience in the age of Ferguson and Black Lives Matter, Republican responses have frequently seemed adrift and uncertain. So Carson — who is not just a black Republican but was, as Desmond-Harris put it, "a black folk hero" due to his rags-to-riches story — likely seems to many conservatives to be a very effective messenger pitching a conservative approach to racial issues.
First of all almost anyone who watched the debate will tell you that it was Carson's closing tha was his high point, "Well, I haven’t said anything about me being the only one to do anything, so let me try that. I’m the only one to separate siamese twins. The — the only one to operate on babies while they were still in mother’s womb, the only one to take out half of a brain, although you would think, if you go to Washington, that someone had beat me to it..."

But what the article's author Andrew Prokop was trying to say is that objections to the black lives matter movement, which is not only led by a white guy posing as a black guy (Shaun King), but places a target on the backs of policemen, is racist.

So if you think that Ben Carson is gaining popularity because like Trump he is a political outsider, a brilliant man, who is good at articulating his position, according to Vox you are dead wrong. Dr. Carson is gaining popularity because he is the GOP's "house Negro" who appeals to the most racist instincts of the Republican Party.  That Vox claim should get its own chapter in the  "Guinness Book of World Records."

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